Viewpoints: How will Prop 8 overturning affect gay marriage debate in North Carolina?

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down California's Proposition 8 that ended same-sex marriage, setting up a high-stakes fight at the U.S. Supreme Court. RNS photo courtesy Fritz Liess.

UPDATE: A few writers for Wilmington Faith and Values responded to this Viewpoints. Read their answers below.

Q: Will Prop 8 matter to North Carolina’s marriage amendment?

With the overturning of the Prop 8 ban of gay marriage in California this week, Wilmington Faith and Values was wondering how that ruling might affect the gay marriage debate poised for North Carolina this year.

Here is the Religion News Service story about the decision.

North Carolina’s marriage act will go before the public for a vote in May.

So what do you think?

Answers from:

Philip Stine

Philip Stine: “I wish I could believe it would weaken support for the proposed constitutional amendment in North Carolina. But I don’t think it will. On the contrary, supporters all over the country will renew their resolve and open up their wallets to continue to work to support the marriage amendment here. Since we can’t be sure of what the Supreme Court will do about the California ruling, it is incumbent on those who oppose the amendment to marshal their forces and fight harder than ever.”

Bo Dean

Bo Dean: “Prop 8 being overturned again is just a confirmation by the courts that the civil right to marry cannot be denied to adults.

So, we have a civil issue; a matter of civil rights. Of course, I am a blogger for a religion blog here. Why then am I spending any time on this?

It would be nice to say that as a result of following our faith in which we are instructed to, above all else, love one another, that we fight any and all impediments to injustice and inequality in our society. But, unfortunately, I am writing on this because the issue of the day is not clear and many of the “faithful” are actually perpetrators. Amazingly, churches are spending millions to insist that civil laws that allow citizens equal access to rights somehow are an intrusion on their own beliefs.

These very institutions of “faith” seem to say our Constitution, which grants these rights, is absolute for all unless in exceptions only certain conservative Christians deem appropriate, forgoing the entire separation of church and state. Well, it is simple, the issue at hand will not interfere with religious marriage. This is a civil issue, and if we are true to our laws, our Constitution and our very national democratic ideals, marriage will be accessible to all.”

Andy Lee

Andy Lee: “I do think the decision made in California will affect, not only North Carolina, but the entire country. I think it is evidence of the shifting values we are experiencing in America today.

My hope for the definition of marriage to remain “one man and one woman” does not mean I hate gay people. It simply means I believe the commandments written on stone tablets were written in stone for a reason. I believe they were written for good; not harm. They were written by a God who loves his creations.

The Bible is clear concerning marriage and sex.

But our judges and lawmakers are not sworn to follow the Bible.

Their basis for judgment is The Constitution which does not define marriage. Was it an oversight? Or was it inconceivable to these men who wrote such a profound document that our country would one day question this institution?”

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One response to “Viewpoints: How will Prop 8 overturning affect gay marriage debate in North Carolina?

  1. I wish I could believe it would weaken support for the proposed constitutional amendment in North Carolina. But I don’t think it will. On the contrary, supporters all over the country will renew their resolve and open up their wallets to continue to work to support the marriage amendment here. Since we can’t be sure of what the Supreme Court will do about the California ruling, it is incumbent on those who oppose the amendment to marshal their forces and fight harder than ever.

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